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Author Topic: So how did you get your nickname used here?  (Read 33354 times)
Torahteen
Ancient Guru
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Posts: 744



« Reply #60 on: February 15, 2006, 04:15:33 PM »

Torahteen... Hmm...

I was signing up for an e-mail account, and my mom asked what I wanted my user name to be. I absolutly hate numbers in my nicknames, so I had to be original. We are torah following (don't ask), so torahteen popped into my head, despite the fact that I was 12 at the time... whatever Tongue.
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quote="Deleter"]judging gameplay, you can adaquately compare quake 4 with pong[/quote]
seph
Na_th_an
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Posts: 1915



« Reply #61 on: February 15, 2006, 05:14:59 PM »

just goes to show how stupid America is if every other country can switch to Metric but we cant...
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earn.
anarky
Been there, done that
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Posts: 1231


The Blobworld Comics King


« Reply #62 on: February 15, 2006, 06:09:24 PM »

Australia did it 40 something years ago. No dramas...

>anarky
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Anonymous
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« Reply #63 on: February 16, 2006, 02:05:20 AM »

i've heard the argument that our system keeps peoples minds agile, because they constantly have to switch around, instead of locking to zeroes, as na_th_an said.

as i said, this is just something that i have heard someone say, i dont comment on what i think about it ;p
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Dr_Davenstein
Na_th_an
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Posts: 2052


« Reply #64 on: February 16, 2006, 02:45:24 AM »

I have to convert back & forth every day. Our blueprints use both systems.  Wink
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NovaProgramming
Been there, done that
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Posts: 1025



« Reply #65 on: February 16, 2006, 02:50:18 AM »

Instead of converting to the metric system, why don't we (U.S.A.) just make up some new system and make the rest of the world follow it due to our vice-grip on the world?

We could measure everything in terms of liquid chocolate.... that would make for some interesting measurements, and much MUCH more confusing than metric!

 :king: It's the American Way! :king:
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ovaProgramming.

One night I had a dream where I was breaking balls.  The next morning, BALLSBREAKER was born.

Quote from: "Haye, Phillip J."
 Excellent.  Now you can have things without paying for them.

BALLSBREAKER 2
~-_-Status Report-_-~
Engine: 94%
Graphics: 95%
Sound: 100%
A Severe Error has crippled BB2 for the time being... I have to figure it out, but until then you won't see much of it Sad.
-----------------------------
anarky
Been there, done that
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Posts: 1231


The Blobworld Comics King


« Reply #66 on: February 16, 2006, 05:43:00 AM »

I thought the Americans would develop a system based on the half life of an Iraqi regime...

>anarky
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Moneo
Na_th_an
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Posts: 1971


« Reply #67 on: February 17, 2006, 12:14:47 AM »

Hey guys, here's some bits and pieces of an article written at a British university just before the UK went to the metric system. They author makes some very interesting and funny points against the metric system.

SURELY the most irritating excuse produced for the European Commission's banning of British Imperial weights and measures is the claim that feet and inches, gallons and pints, pounds and ounces do not belong in the "modern world". This claim has never cut much ice. The USA put Neil Armstrong on the moon using Imperial measurements and continues to use feet and inches in designing space satellites.

The problem with metric is that every unit is based on the number ten. In weight, for example, there are 10 mg in 1 cg, 10 cg in 1 dg, 10 dg in 1 g, 10g in 1 Dg, 10Dg in 1hg, 10 hg in 1 kg, 10 kg in 1 Mg, and so on. Although metric's decimal structure is much acclaimed by supporters of conversion, the rigidity of constant multiplications of ten frequently means that metric measures overshoot desirable or useful proportions. Take the experience of the metric system in the building industry as an example. Metric fails to produce any intermediate unit between the decimetre (4 inches) and the metre (40 inches) and so deprives builders of the Imperial foot, used throughout history and suitable for a wide range of building needs such as planning grids. As a result, the building trade sector, both in Britain and in Europe, has created the "metric foot" of 30 centimetres together with larger units of 120 or 90 centimetres (metric yards) into which metric feet may divide. Metric in the building industry survives because the metre can be discarded in favour of measures that reproduce the very Imperial units metric was intended to replace.

Cans of soft drink provide another example of metric inefficiency. Drink cans cannot be produced in metric units because there are no metric measures available that reflect normal drinking quantities. The litre is much too big and the centilitre is much too small. Instead, the canning industry has had to divide the litre by about a third and produce a non-standard metric measure of "330 millilitres" in order to produce a suitable quantity. The figure of 330 millilitres does not constitute an exact third of a litre because no metric measure can be divided by three without producing an infinitely recurring decimal(3.333333 etc). Thus, three cans of Coke make 0.99 litres, not one litre. Rather than streamlining our system of measurement, metrication disrupts it.

Metric measures do not bear any relevance to the vast diversity of human activities such as commerce, construction, surveying, cooking and weighing new-born babies. Whereas the British system has evolved around the essentials of what people carry, drink or work with (producing the pound, pint and foot), the metric system is a combination of unergonomic units based on a number that can seldom be cleanly divided and from which important proportions cannot be expressed as single units. Metric is workable only by abandoning its standard measures, the metre, kilo and litre, and replacing them with units of different sizes based on human needs. And because of metric's decimal structure, desirable quantities can only be represented by larger numbers of numerous digits: the logical unit of one pound of tinned food therefore becomes the metric standard of 420 grams; one gallon of engine oil becomes five litres of oil; a straightforward foot of fabric becomes twenty-five centimetres of fabric; two inch wide masking tape becomes fifty millimetres; a pint of milk becomes five hundred millilitre units; and roof-boxes, baths and tables previously measured as five or six feet explode into hundreds of centimetres or thousands of millimetres.Such conversions do not make numbers more logical or streamlined, just bigger. There is no magic process by which measuring the world in metric improves it.

Having lost the technical argument, metricators resort to the claim that Imperial measures are "complicated and difficult to understand". This is rather like suggesting people are unable to grasp the concept of a right angle because right angles consist of ninety degrees rather than 100. It is a simple fact that we all live in an "irrational" 365 or 366 day year in which the measurements of hours, days and months involves units as diverse as 60, 24, 7, 14, 28, 30, 31, 12 and 52. Although there is not a single ten involved in measuring the passage of time, this writer has yet to meet anyone who cannot tell the time because of the "confusing" division of hours into 60 rather than 100 minutes, or who is unable to remember the day because there are seven days in a week instead of a logical "ten".

An English village sweet shop can no longer sell four ounces of butterscotch but has to say "113 grams" and 9 by 4 inch envelopes will be re-labelled "229 x 102 millimetres" in a clumsy attempt to show how accurate metric can be. The British people, who have been quite happy with pints and pounds, will be forced instead to learn words like "decagram" and "hectalitre". But nowhere are the effects of metrication more ludicrous than in our courts. Any witness who refers to a six-inch knife will be told by the judge to say a "152 millimetre" knife and instructed to speak only in terms of centimetres and metres.

Other firms to feel the pressure of Euro-remoulding include rural garages which make small sales of petrol and have found it difficult meeting the cost of spending thousands of pounds on metric pumps. According to garage owner Frank Robertson from Cloughton, North Yorkshire, "It's uneconomic to lashout on new pumps serving litres." Mr Robertson's Orchard Garage opened in 1929 and has now closed as a result of metrication. According to a motor trade estimate, four thousand rural garages have closed.

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Anonymous
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« Reply #68 on: February 17, 2006, 01:04:02 AM »

excellent counterpoint, moneo
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na_th_an
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« Reply #69 on: February 17, 2006, 08:07:19 AM »

I don't care which is better. But I think that having the old one when the whole word uses metric is an obstacle. Changing isn't much of a hassle. The only thing against changing I could think about is the nostalgy factor.

Think about the odd fractions you get when using the old imperial system. You are often dividing by 3 and other numbers which will multiply the number of decimals in the results. In a scientiphical environment, the less "carried error", the better, and the imperial system favourishes the carried error increase as we are doing more and more calculations.

It's not so difficult to change. It looks like it's difficult at first, but I guarantee you that in two years you'll know exactly how long is a kilometre or how heavy is a kilogram.

Having to change all the driving signs, for example... well, I don't think it's a very big problem. We had to change ALL our coins and paper money. And we survived :lol: And note that 1 euro = 166.3860 pesetas, so the conversion was tricky at times Cheesy
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« Reply #70 on: February 17, 2006, 08:16:29 AM »

Quote from: "na_th_an"
I don't care which is better. But I think that having the old one when the whole word uses metric is an obstacle. Changing isn't much of a hassle. The only thing against changing I could think about is the nostalgy factor.

Think about the odd fractions you get when using the old imperial system. You are often dividing by 3 and other numbers which will multiply the number of decimals in the results. In a scientiphical environment, the less "carried error", the better, and the imperial system favourishes the carried error increase as we are doing more and more calculations.

It's not so difficult to change. It looks like it's difficult at first, but I guarantee you that in two years you'll know exactly how long is a kilometre or how heavy is a kilogram.

Having to change all the driving signs, for example... well, I don't think it's a very big problem. We had to change ALL our coins and paper money. And we survived :lol: And note that 1 euro = 166.3860 pesetas, so the conversion was tricky at times Cheesy
It's not like all of europe and most of the world just suddenly had the same standard..
It was adopted by most countries you* know..


*You is generic and does not refer to na_th_an
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anarky
Been there, done that
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Posts: 1231


The Blobworld Comics King


« Reply #71 on: February 17, 2006, 11:03:02 AM »

If you live to 120, and tell your great grandkids about the world when your parents went to school, referring to inches, feet pounds, furlongs, yards and chains or even the acre for Pete's sake, they are going to look at you and think "WTF is he on about?" Imperial measurements are no longer taught in schools. Not even in cooking or textiles.

Metric is the (now) favoured way of measuring.

BTW a can of coke for example in Australia is 375mL. Some alcoholic drinks come in 440mL cans, just because they can.

It is often forgotten that an original Imperial yard is slightly different to the US yard. The same applies to a mile.

Go anywhere in the world that uses metric, and tell someone they need to be 5,448m from where you are. They will know how far to go.

As for time, it's a little more complicated than just switching to metric. It has taken thousands of years and countless civilizations to get the time right. The fact that our planet has a 365.254 day long year (a "day" being approximately 23 hours and 57 minutes or so) makes it god-awful problematic to keeping a metric standard. This is where your article holds up. Metric really isn't practical for time. But for distances and whatnot, it is.

90 degree angles, 360 degree circles. A hangover from imperial nautical times? Try telling the Naval forces of the world they must use metric to navigate.

Explained.

>anarky
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NovaProgramming
Been there, done that
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Posts: 1025



« Reply #72 on: February 17, 2006, 02:30:40 PM »

I still think liquid chocolate would be better (and tastier)...
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ovaProgramming.

One night I had a dream where I was breaking balls.  The next morning, BALLSBREAKER was born.

Quote from: "Haye, Phillip J."
 Excellent.  Now you can have things without paying for them.

BALLSBREAKER 2
~-_-Status Report-_-~
Engine: 94%
Graphics: 95%
Sound: 100%
A Severe Error has crippled BB2 for the time being... I have to figure it out, but until then you won't see much of it Sad.
-----------------------------
Zack
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WWW
« Reply #73 on: February 17, 2006, 03:05:07 PM »

Without resorting to google or wikipedia...who here knows what an arcsecond is? :wink:
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anarky
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Posts: 1231


The Blobworld Comics King


« Reply #74 on: February 17, 2006, 03:11:19 PM »

An arc being part of a circle, a second being one 60th of a minute, a minute being one 60th of a degree...

=360*60*60
=360*3600

Or more simply put: 1/3600 of a degree.

Where I live on Earth, thats about 50 metres. Tongue

>anarky
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