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General => General/Misc => Topic started by: anarky on February 07, 2006, 02:13:41 PM



Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: anarky on February 07, 2006, 02:13:41 PM
If you chose it, which I would say most of you did, why did you choose that over anything else? Please explain yourselves.

>anarky - Because I cause a mess with everything...


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: MystikShadows on February 07, 2006, 02:38:52 PM
I added a touch of Magic to the darkness of my quote ;-) hence MystikShadows hehe.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Sumo Jo on February 07, 2006, 02:41:14 PM
It was the very first thing that popped in my head.  There's really no significance to it.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: TheDarkJay on February 07, 2006, 02:47:47 PM
TheJaymaster is my Xbox Live account. On another forum TheJaymaster was taken so I tried TheDarkJay. Liked it more and stuck with it.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Zack on February 07, 2006, 03:36:47 PM
My name is Zack.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Dio on February 07, 2006, 05:31:46 PM
Mine means god (http://forum.qbasicnews.com/viewtopic.php?p=133565#133565)  in some other language. i forget.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Rattrapmax6 on February 07, 2006, 05:43:34 PM
Rattrapmax6 was my very first online account name,. It has just stuck with me ever since....  :wink:


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: seph on February 07, 2006, 05:55:20 PM
I've gone through dozens of pointless names until I started playing FFVII. Then I started using Sephiroth, but after like a year or so I wanted to change it to something a little less Sephiroth and a little more me, so I went with Seph. I'm thinking maybe I should change it again soon, just because everyone else seems to (well maybe just Nek)...


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Mr Match on February 07, 2006, 07:20:11 PM
part one: Name of a dude in a Megaman game.
part two: I like fire  :wtnod:


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: barok on February 07, 2006, 08:05:59 PM
Random Scrabble pieces.  Interestingly enough, barok is the name of a caveman character in the Phillipines i think...


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Dr_Davenstein on February 07, 2006, 08:53:09 PM
My name is Dave. Other than that, there is no real reason for it.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: whitetiger0990 on February 07, 2006, 09:03:05 PM
Tiger is for power...
so...
whitetiger is.. WHITE POWER!!!
okay I'm kidding! Don't hurt meeee...

long ago back in the day before cable was everywhere... me mom was setting up AOL. I needed an account. I like kitties a lot so I was stuck between whitetiger and blacktiger...

Of course both of those were chosen =p so I added some numbers

whitetiger15564
...that eventually ran into some spammage problem... and my parents (trying to filter me =p) canceled it and I got another. I chose whitetiger0990 for some unknown subconcious reason... It's a coincidence that it's symmetric and the month/year I was born =p (mmyy)

yuuup...


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Radical Raccoon on February 07, 2006, 09:24:30 PM
so it has nothing to do with power rangers?


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Dio on February 07, 2006, 11:12:26 PM
Quote from: "whitetiger0990"
It's a coincidence that it's symmetric

thats called a palindrome.

like: "A man, a plan, a canal, Panama"


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Zack on February 07, 2006, 11:46:33 PM
Quote from: "Dio"
Quote from: "whitetiger0990"
It's a coincidence that it's symmetric

thats called a palindrome.

like: "A man, a plan, a canal, Panama"

THAT ISN'T A &#%*ing PALINDROME!
Code:
DIM AS STRING Phrase,R_Phrase
Phrase="a man a plan a canal panama"
FOR I=LEN(Phrase) TO 1 STEP -1
    R_Phrase=R_Phrase + MID(Phrase,I,1)
NEXT
IF R_Phrase=Phrase THEN PRINT "Palindrome confirmed."
IF R_Phrase<>Phrase THEN PRINT "Not a palindrome."
SLEEP
:P


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Dr_Davenstein on February 07, 2006, 11:48:42 PM
Cool.  :lol:


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Moneo on February 08, 2006, 12:10:37 AM
Well, my last name is Moneo, which is pretty unique. There's a famous Spanish architect named Rafael Moneo, but that's about it.

I always use Moneo or variations with my first name Edward.

I often wonder why most people invent strange names instead of using their real first or last name or both, like Antoni Gual, simple and straight to the point. What's the purpose of using a disguised name or nickname?
*****


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Pete on February 08, 2006, 12:18:58 AM
I'm unoriginal.


Actually, I probably would have gone with another name, but when I signed up on these forums a year and a half ago, I wanted people to know that I'm the guy from Pete's QB Site...(I know, a lame title for a site, but I've had it since 1998 when I was 13.)


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: barok on February 08, 2006, 01:18:13 AM
It's also one of the most famous qb sites in the q-munity. :P


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Sterling Christensen on February 08, 2006, 06:20:39 AM
It's my middle and last name.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: NecrosIhsan on February 08, 2006, 07:22:39 AM
"Necros Ihsan" are the first two names in my nickname, "Necros Ihsan Nodtveidt". I chose that nickname so the initials would be "NIN", to fool certain people into thinking I was a Trent Reznor fan (which I'm not, but the idea worked).


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: na_th_an on February 08, 2006, 07:30:36 AM
Quote from: "Sumo Jo"
It was the very first thing that popped in my head.  There's really no significance to it.


Same here.

In fact it happened when I was signing up in Hotmail for an email account, back in 1999. I never thought about a nickname, so I skimmed over my table and found the "1. Outside" LP by David Bowie. The first thing I could read was "The Diary of Nathan Adler" so I picked up nathan, but as nathan was already assigned, and I don't like stupid numbers, I used the funny underscores.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: jsmith71 on February 08, 2006, 08:44:37 AM
My name.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: na_th_an on February 08, 2006, 09:04:15 AM
Quote from: "Moneo"
I often wonder why most people invent strange names instead of using their real first or last name or both, like Antoni Gual, simple and straight to the point. What's the purpose of using a disguised name or nickname?*****


I guess it's simply for keeping annonymous. Not like you're gonna do nasties or something like that, but more for the sake of it. I'd rather keep my real life and my internet life separated.

Also, it's a way to choose a more unique name. My real name is pretty common, and my surnames have "ñ" and accented vowels, so they are unusable for internet.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: relsoft on February 08, 2006, 09:23:33 AM
Quote from: "barok"
Random Scrabble pieces.  Interestingly enough, barok is the name of a caveman character in the Phillipines i think...


Yep. I wonder how you got your name though. :*)

Rel = my Initial


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: anarky on February 08, 2006, 10:17:30 AM
Unfortunately, I HATE even saying my name...

>anarky


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: KiZ on February 08, 2006, 10:35:13 AM
I feel that using my real name is way too formal for some reason. I guess its also something about the internet that allows you to reinvent yourself, and I take great delight in that. (I dont modify my personality though, I stay true to myself.)

However I certainly see why some people would prefer their real name to use. Its just a matter of preference.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: relsoft on February 08, 2006, 12:28:19 PM
Quote from: "anarky"
Unfortunately, I HATE even saying my name...

>anarky


Then why not change your name to "Mike"?
 :rotfl:


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: anarky on February 08, 2006, 12:35:12 PM
That's my real nickname. My online one is anarky, obviously...

>MIKE


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: LooseCaboose on February 08, 2006, 06:07:29 PM
Quote from: "Moneo"

I often wonder why most people invent strange names instead of using their real first or last name or both, like Antoni Gual, simple and straight to the point. What's the purpose of using a disguised name or nickname?

I don't go by my real name in real life all the time either. About four years ago, my boss (now my flatmate) nicknamed me Obiwan. The shortend name Obi just stuck and now many of my friends, my girlfriend and all my workmates call me that. Some people that I have known for a while don't even know my real name ;-).

The name LooseCaboose comes from playing a LAN game of (I think) Duke3D. The default player name was LooseGoose and I thought it was funny, I later changed it to LooseCaboose to be a little more original (turns out it isn't ;-)).


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Piptol on February 08, 2006, 06:47:55 PM
I'd love to say 'Piptol' had some deep and hidden meaning. It does have some significance.. but mainly I just like it cos it's short, snappy and unique.

My nickname in real-life is 'Monday'. Simply because my mates caught me on a date with a girl when I'd sneaked out the house and not told them about it.. and it happened to be on a bank-holiday monday..  :lol:


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: whitetiger0990 on February 08, 2006, 07:12:24 PM
Quote from: "Dio"
Quote from: "whitetiger0990"
It's a coincidence that it's symmetric

thats called a palindrome.

yeah yeah I know. I couldn't remember/care enough to put palidrome =p


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Dio on February 08, 2006, 07:18:23 PM
Quote from: "Zack"
Quote from: "Dio"
Quote from: "whitetiger0990"
It's a coincidence that it's symmetric

thats called a palindrome.

like: "A man, a plan, a canal, Panama"

THAT ISN'T A &#%*ing PALINDROME!


a man a plan a canal panama
amanap lanac a nalp a nam a

umm... yes it is.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: whitetiger0990 on February 08, 2006, 08:39:48 PM
Quote
umm... yes it is.

*whoosh* =p

Look for smilies...

It's only a palindrome if you skip spaces.. =p


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Dio on February 08, 2006, 11:18:13 PM
and punctuation. point?


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: whitetiger0990 on February 09, 2006, 12:32:49 AM
Quote from: "Dio"
and punctuation. point?

...point is that you still are looking over the smilies... You seem to be the only one taking it seriously =p


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Anonymous on February 09, 2006, 07:48:45 AM
cha0s is the name of the ninja in my avatar picture

<-------

i added the 0 to show that I am elite.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Dio on February 09, 2006, 06:14:58 PM
Quote from: "whitetiger0990"
Quote from: "Dio"
and punctuation. point?

...point is that you still are looking over the smilies... You seem to be the only one taking it seriously =p


ohhhh...i didn't even read Zacks code. i thought that that was somthing completely different. my bad.  :oops:


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Deleter on February 09, 2006, 06:56:28 PM
Quote from: "KiZ"
I feel that using my real name is way too formal for some reason. I guess its also something about the internet that allows you to reinvent yourself, and I take great delight in that. (I dont modify my personality though, I stay true to myself.)

However I certainly see why some people would prefer their real name to use. Its just a matter of preference.

I feel the same way.
The origin of my nickname is pretty lame...I was stumped as for what name I was going to use to sign up for some forum..so I let my eyes wander. Lo and behold, I saw the Delete key...you can guess the rest. ;)


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: SSC on February 10, 2006, 03:44:35 AM
SSC is short and simple, though hard for some people to say in voice chat =) but it stands for the name I gave my creations.

It started as Smithco Games (Smith being my last name), after further consideration though it was changed to SmithcoSoft Creations those initials being SSC, I have a few other names but I mostly stick with that.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: na_th_an on February 10, 2006, 08:08:16 AM
Quote from: "Deleter"
Quote from: "KiZ"
I feel that using my real name is way too formal for some reason. I guess its also something about the internet that allows you to reinvent yourself, and I take great delight in that. (I dont modify my personality though, I stay true to myself.)

However I certainly see why some people would prefer their real name to use. Its just a matter of preference.

I feel the same way.
The origin of my nickname is pretty lame...I was stumped as for what name I was going to use to sign up for some forum..so I let my eyes wander. Lo and behold, I saw the Delete key...you can guess the rest. ;)


It's a good thing you are not spanish, otherwise your nickname would be " <-- "

:lol:


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Agamemnus on February 10, 2006, 02:16:16 PM
It's from the Illiad. But the Romans are better.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: yetifoot on February 10, 2006, 03:35:20 PM
I chose yetifoot completely at random,  I used to have the nickname mushroom when i was younger because a had a bit of a bowl haircut and acne, but luckily thats changed now!


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: TheDarkJay on February 10, 2006, 04:13:03 PM
I might have to change my nickname to stretchy or elastic-kid because people have started calling me that...curse my english teacher noticing I strech alot (my body goes stiff quite a bit for some reason)


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: barok on February 10, 2006, 09:10:38 PM
Quote from: "yetifoot"
I chose yetifoot completely at random,  I used to have the nickname mushroom when i was younger because a had a bit of a bowl haircut and acne, but luckily thats changed now!


I know someone with the nic 'potatoe.' ;P


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: jupiter3888 on February 12, 2006, 02:16:07 AM
the reason my nicname is jupiter3888 is because when i was signining up for hotmail my favourite planet to observe with my telescope was jupiter (it has now changed to the moon) and obviously jupiter was taken so i added the numbers of my birthday onto the end - 3rd august 1988.
on another note i use the nicname lunatic in msn messenger lately but have changed it to [LUNA tic] because IMO it looks better

that is all.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: NovaProgramming on February 14, 2006, 02:04:46 AM
NovaProgramming...
I guess mine isn't as interesting as I thought

In that good old game Starcraft... on Battle.Net... I was fortunate enough (a long time ago)  to secure the nickname "Nova"  which I thought was pretty cool.  But it really wasn't... everyone thought that "Nova" was a girls name, so I kept getting hit on... but anyways... When I signed up, I just went with slapping "Programming" on the end, cause... well, yeah.

Nowadays, of course, everyone (who's on my MSN list anyways) knows I'm "Flaid", and that is from Don Miguel's RPG which was released in the oh-so-glorious pirated RPG Maker 2000, where there's a dog who is very badly translated:
Quote from: "Flaid, from Don Miguel's RPG"
My Nick is Flaid!
I am ordinary dog, but you are special man!
I search for you whole my life!
[Don Miguel:] How old you, Flaid?
[Flaid:] Well, I'm big enough... and I'm almost two!  Two weeks old!


I dunno, I thought it was original.  Maybe I'll swing things so that's my nickname here someday... if I decide to stick around this time ;)


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: whitetiger0990 on February 14, 2006, 12:55:50 PM
Quote from: "NovaProgramming"
everyone thought that "Nova" was a girls name, so I kept getting hit on...

Bah that's nothing, whenever I use Tricia as my name I always get hit on =p


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Anonymous on February 14, 2006, 01:58:03 PM
Tricia?


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: KiZ on February 14, 2006, 02:43:33 PM
Yeah. Whtiger is gender-confused.

Its ok, he is going to therapy for it.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: NovaProgramming on February 15, 2006, 02:16:09 AM
For some reason I guess no one who played Starcraft ever played Diablo II, cause the sorcerer gets a move called "Nova", which is where I got the name in the first place...

I also used to get hit on when my name was "PhantasyStarIV"  (cause I love that game to death...) ... so strange, these people and their assumptions.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: whitetiger0990 on February 15, 2006, 02:42:00 AM
Quote from: "KiZ"
Yeah. Whtiger is gender-confused.

Its ok, he is going to therapy for it.



=3




You know.. Tricia.. Trillian... 42.........


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: anarky on February 15, 2006, 04:22:00 AM
Well it's a known fact that more American's are obese/overweight by percentage than Australians. Not by much though... It's also known that on average, an American will eat two take-out meals per day, where Aussie's average 1.

Actually, I'm closer to anorexic than fat... SJ Zero is actually stockier than me.

>anarky - 62KG Gross Weight.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: yetifoot on February 15, 2006, 07:39:37 AM
Code:
>anarky - 62KG Gross Weight.


what is this in 'old money'

makes me laugh, we've been metric since about ten years before i was born, yet...

I am 5 foot 10, weigh about 10 and a half stone, was about 8lbs at birth, it's about 2 miles into town.

I want them to metric'ize time next... (i think its about 0.4 o'clock here)


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: na_th_an on February 15, 2006, 08:56:57 AM
No matter how much you all groan, decimal metric system is useful and more efficient than your ancient ways of counting body parts and lifting stones :lol:


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Dr_Davenstein on February 15, 2006, 09:43:27 AM
Oh yeah? I weigh about 180 beers.  :lol:


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: yetifoot on February 15, 2006, 10:01:53 AM
Quote from: "na_th_an"
No matter how much you all groan, decimal metric system is useful and more efficient than your ancient ways of counting body parts and lifting stones :lol:


yeah, i do agree, i can never remember how many ounces to a pound, and pounds to a stone.  Its just funny how we've been metric for about 30 years, but in most areas people still use imperial measurements.  (Except greengrocers who get prosecuted if they use imperial)


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: seph on February 15, 2006, 11:48:19 AM
i dont think USA is even close to switching to metric (which sucks because when it comes to measuring quantities, i know the gallon and then im fricken lost...) but yet in science we all still use metrium so thats coool :)


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: na_th_an on February 15, 2006, 12:22:34 PM
That's because you are accustomed to old measurements. It's the same when we switched from Pesetas to Euros five years ago. At first it was a nightmare, and nobody knew really how much money they were paying without doing calculations, but now it has changed, I think in Euros now.

The centesimal metric system is simply more simple :lol: at least to do calculations. You know that you always have to add or take away zeroes.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: whitetiger0990 on February 15, 2006, 02:07:47 PM
well the U.S. tried once... My mom was in 5th grade. Confused the heck out of everyone.



Plus if we did move to metric.. Think of all the road signs that will need changed! and then people will have to learn to drive in kmph instead of mph...
I mean weights shouldn't mess everything up to bad.. =p


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Torahteen on February 15, 2006, 04:15:33 PM
Torahteen... Hmm...

I was signing up for an e-mail account, and my mom asked what I wanted my user name to be. I absolutly hate numbers in my nicknames, so I had to be original. We are torah following (don't ask), so torahteen popped into my head, despite the fact that I was 12 at the time... whatever :P.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: seph on February 15, 2006, 05:14:59 PM
just goes to show how stupid America is if every other country can switch to Metric but we cant...


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: anarky on February 15, 2006, 06:09:24 PM
Australia did it 40 something years ago. No dramas...

>anarky


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Anonymous on February 16, 2006, 02:05:20 AM
i've heard the argument that our system keeps peoples minds agile, because they constantly have to switch around, instead of locking to zeroes, as na_th_an said.

as i said, this is just something that i have heard someone say, i dont comment on what i think about it ;p


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Dr_Davenstein on February 16, 2006, 02:45:24 AM
I have to convert back & forth every day. Our blueprints use both systems.  ;)


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: NovaProgramming on February 16, 2006, 02:50:18 AM
Instead of converting to the metric system, why don't we (U.S.A.) just make up some new system and make the rest of the world follow it due to our vice-grip on the world?

We could measure everything in terms of liquid chocolate.... that would make for some interesting measurements, and much MUCH more confusing than metric!

 :king: It's the American Way! :king:


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: anarky on February 16, 2006, 05:43:00 AM
I thought the Americans would develop a system based on the half life of an Iraqi regime...

>anarky


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Moneo on February 17, 2006, 12:14:47 AM
Hey guys, here's some bits and pieces of an article written at a British university just before the UK went to the metric system. They author makes some very interesting and funny points against the metric system.

SURELY the most irritating excuse produced for the European Commission's banning of British Imperial weights and measures is the claim that feet and inches, gallons and pints, pounds and ounces do not belong in the "modern world". This claim has never cut much ice. The USA put Neil Armstrong on the moon using Imperial measurements and continues to use feet and inches in designing space satellites.

The problem with metric is that every unit is based on the number ten. In weight, for example, there are 10 mg in 1 cg, 10 cg in 1 dg, 10 dg in 1 g, 10g in 1 Dg, 10Dg in 1hg, 10 hg in 1 kg, 10 kg in 1 Mg, and so on. Although metric's decimal structure is much acclaimed by supporters of conversion, the rigidity of constant multiplications of ten frequently means that metric measures overshoot desirable or useful proportions. Take the experience of the metric system in the building industry as an example. Metric fails to produce any intermediate unit between the decimetre (4 inches) and the metre (40 inches) and so deprives builders of the Imperial foot, used throughout history and suitable for a wide range of building needs such as planning grids. As a result, the building trade sector, both in Britain and in Europe, has created the "metric foot" of 30 centimetres together with larger units of 120 or 90 centimetres (metric yards) into which metric feet may divide. Metric in the building industry survives because the metre can be discarded in favour of measures that reproduce the very Imperial units metric was intended to replace.

Cans of soft drink provide another example of metric inefficiency. Drink cans cannot be produced in metric units because there are no metric measures available that reflect normal drinking quantities. The litre is much too big and the centilitre is much too small. Instead, the canning industry has had to divide the litre by about a third and produce a non-standard metric measure of "330 millilitres" in order to produce a suitable quantity. The figure of 330 millilitres does not constitute an exact third of a litre because no metric measure can be divided by three without producing an infinitely recurring decimal(3.333333 etc). Thus, three cans of Coke make 0.99 litres, not one litre. Rather than streamlining our system of measurement, metrication disrupts it.

Metric measures do not bear any relevance to the vast diversity of human activities such as commerce, construction, surveying, cooking and weighing new-born babies. Whereas the British system has evolved around the essentials of what people carry, drink or work with (producing the pound, pint and foot), the metric system is a combination of unergonomic units based on a number that can seldom be cleanly divided and from which important proportions cannot be expressed as single units. Metric is workable only by abandoning its standard measures, the metre, kilo and litre, and replacing them with units of different sizes based on human needs. And because of metric's decimal structure, desirable quantities can only be represented by larger numbers of numerous digits: the logical unit of one pound of tinned food therefore becomes the metric standard of 420 grams; one gallon of engine oil becomes five litres of oil; a straightforward foot of fabric becomes twenty-five centimetres of fabric; two inch wide masking tape becomes fifty millimetres; a pint of milk becomes five hundred millilitre units; and roof-boxes, baths and tables previously measured as five or six feet explode into hundreds of centimetres or thousands of millimetres.Such conversions do not make numbers more logical or streamlined, just bigger. There is no magic process by which measuring the world in metric improves it.

Having lost the technical argument, metricators resort to the claim that Imperial measures are "complicated and difficult to understand". This is rather like suggesting people are unable to grasp the concept of a right angle because right angles consist of ninety degrees rather than 100. It is a simple fact that we all live in an "irrational" 365 or 366 day year in which the measurements of hours, days and months involves units as diverse as 60, 24, 7, 14, 28, 30, 31, 12 and 52. Although there is not a single ten involved in measuring the passage of time, this writer has yet to meet anyone who cannot tell the time because of the "confusing" division of hours into 60 rather than 100 minutes, or who is unable to remember the day because there are seven days in a week instead of a logical "ten".

An English village sweet shop can no longer sell four ounces of butterscotch but has to say "113 grams" and 9 by 4 inch envelopes will be re-labelled "229 x 102 millimetres" in a clumsy attempt to show how accurate metric can be. The British people, who have been quite happy with pints and pounds, will be forced instead to learn words like "decagram" and "hectalitre". But nowhere are the effects of metrication more ludicrous than in our courts. Any witness who refers to a six-inch knife will be told by the judge to say a "152 millimetre" knife and instructed to speak only in terms of centimetres and metres.

Other firms to feel the pressure of Euro-remoulding include rural garages which make small sales of petrol and have found it difficult meeting the cost of spending thousands of pounds on metric pumps. According to garage owner Frank Robertson from Cloughton, North Yorkshire, "It's uneconomic to lashout on new pumps serving litres." Mr Robertson's Orchard Garage opened in 1929 and has now closed as a result of metrication. According to a motor trade estimate, four thousand rural garages have closed.

*****


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Anonymous on February 17, 2006, 01:04:02 AM
excellent counterpoint, moneo


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: na_th_an on February 17, 2006, 08:07:19 AM
I don't care which is better. But I think that having the old one when the whole word uses metric is an obstacle. Changing isn't much of a hassle. The only thing against changing I could think about is the nostalgy factor.

Think about the odd fractions you get when using the old imperial system. You are often dividing by 3 and other numbers which will multiply the number of decimals in the results. In a scientiphical environment, the less "carried error", the better, and the imperial system favourishes the carried error increase as we are doing more and more calculations.

It's not so difficult to change. It looks like it's difficult at first, but I guarantee you that in two years you'll know exactly how long is a kilometre or how heavy is a kilogram.

Having to change all the driving signs, for example... well, I don't think it's a very big problem. We had to change ALL our coins and paper money. And we survived :lol: And note that 1 euro = 166.3860 pesetas, so the conversion was tricky at times :D


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Z!re on February 17, 2006, 08:16:29 AM
Quote from: "na_th_an"
I don't care which is better. But I think that having the old one when the whole word uses metric is an obstacle. Changing isn't much of a hassle. The only thing against changing I could think about is the nostalgy factor.

Think about the odd fractions you get when using the old imperial system. You are often dividing by 3 and other numbers which will multiply the number of decimals in the results. In a scientiphical environment, the less "carried error", the better, and the imperial system favourishes the carried error increase as we are doing more and more calculations.

It's not so difficult to change. It looks like it's difficult at first, but I guarantee you that in two years you'll know exactly how long is a kilometre or how heavy is a kilogram.

Having to change all the driving signs, for example... well, I don't think it's a very big problem. We had to change ALL our coins and paper money. And we survived :lol: And note that 1 euro = 166.3860 pesetas, so the conversion was tricky at times :D
It's not like all of europe and most of the world just suddenly had the same standard..
It was adopted by most countries you* know..


*You is generic and does not refer to na_th_an


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: anarky on February 17, 2006, 11:03:02 AM
If you live to 120, and tell your great grandkids about the world when your parents went to school, referring to inches, feet pounds, furlongs, yards and chains or even the acre for Pete's sake, they are going to look at you and think "WTF is he on about?" Imperial measurements are no longer taught in schools. Not even in cooking or textiles.

Metric is the (now) favoured way of measuring.

BTW a can of coke for example in Australia is 375mL. Some alcoholic drinks come in 440mL cans, just because they can.

It is often forgotten that an original Imperial yard is slightly different to the US yard. The same applies to a mile.

Go anywhere in the world that uses metric, and tell someone they need to be 5,448m from where you are. They will know how far to go.

As for time, it's a little more complicated than just switching to metric. It has taken thousands of years and countless civilizations to get the time right. The fact that our planet has a 365.254 day long year (a "day" being approximately 23 hours and 57 minutes or so) makes it god-awful problematic to keeping a metric standard. This is where your article holds up. Metric really isn't practical for time. But for distances and whatnot, it is.

90 degree angles, 360 degree circles. A hangover from imperial nautical times? Try telling the Naval forces of the world they must use metric to navigate.

Explained.

>anarky


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: NovaProgramming on February 17, 2006, 02:30:40 PM
I still think liquid chocolate would be better (and tastier)...


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Zack on February 17, 2006, 03:05:07 PM
Without resorting to google or wikipedia...who here knows what an arcsecond is? :wink:


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: anarky on February 17, 2006, 03:11:19 PM
An arc being part of a circle, a second being one 60th of a minute, a minute being one 60th of a degree...

=360*60*60
=360*3600

Or more simply put: 1/3600 of a degree.

Where I live on Earth, thats about 50 metres. :P

>anarky


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Phydaux on February 18, 2006, 08:33:32 AM
I was digging aroung one day looking at how metric time wold be implemented/used and came accross this excelent artical on why there are 24hrs in a day: http://mathforum.org/library/drmath/view/58460.html

---

Back on topic I've used my nickname all over the place since I was about 14. I stick with it as I often run into people who know me. BTW it's pronounced Fido... if you didn't know. ;)


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: anarky on February 18, 2006, 08:35:34 AM
I somehow doubt that had anything to do with it. An interesting read, however.

>anarky


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Moneo on February 18, 2006, 10:57:50 PM
Quote from: "na_th_an"
I don't care which is better. But I think that having the old one when the whole word uses metric is an obstacle. Changing isn't much of a hassle. The only thing against changing I could think about is the nostalgy factor.
......
It's not so difficult to change. It looks like it's difficult at first, but I guarantee you that in two years you'll know exactly how long is a kilometre or how heavy is a kilogram.

Having to change all the driving signs, for example... well, I don't think it's a very big problem.
......

I haven't  actually researched the issue of converting to a metric system. The excerpt of the article that I posted before, I found by chance a few months ago.

Nathan, you say that you don't care which is better. You're right. Which is better is not the issue. Both systems have their merits.

The big issue is CHANGE. You say that changing isn't much of hassle, and that it's not so difficult to change.  You're right regarding change on an individual basis. But what about on an industry-wide basis? The automotive industry in the USA is undergoing some bad times. What would happen to this industry if you now burdened it with a conversion to metric? And what about all the other major industries?

Frankly, I don't know how they sustained the change to metric in the UK. They must have really been eager to get into the European Common Market.
*****


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Phydaux on February 19, 2006, 02:11:52 PM
Quote from: "Moneo"
Quote from: "na_th_an"
I don't care which is better. But I think that having the old one when the whole word uses metric is an obstacle. Changing isn't much of a hassle. The only thing against changing I could think about is the nostalgy factor.
......
It's not so difficult to change. It looks like it's difficult at first, but I guarantee you that in two years you'll know exactly how long is a kilometre or how heavy is a kilogram.

Having to change all the driving signs, for example... well, I don't think it's a very big problem.
......

I haven't  actually researched the issue of converting to a metric system. The excerpt of the article that I posted before, I found by chance a few months ago.

Nathan, you say that you don't care which is better. You're right. Which is better is not the issue. Both systems have their merits.

The big issue is CHANGE. You say that changing isn't much of hassle, and that it's not so difficult to change.  You're right regarding change on an individual basis. But what about on an industry-wide basis? The automotive industry in the USA is undergoing some bad times. What would happen to this industry if you now burdened it with a conversion to metric? And what about all the other major industries?

Frankly, I don't know how they sustained the change to metric in the UK. They must have really been eager to get into the European Common Market.
*****
The UK is messed up and isn't really metric.
Schools only teach metric, but the UK public mostly runs on imperal.
Milk is still sold in pints with litres in small print. No one askes the milk-man for 0.568261485 litres, but thats the only size you can get it in.
Motoring is still miles and miles/hr. And if you speak to builders etc they work in feet/inches. (But have to order their goods in metric.)

Ireland did things properly. They converted to metric (road signs and all) in 2 days if I remember correctly.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: na_th_an on February 20, 2006, 05:00:37 AM
Quote from: "Moneo"
The big issue is CHANGE. You say that changing isn't much of hassle, and that it's not so difficult to change.  You're right regarding change on an individual basis. But what about on an industry-wide basis? The automotive industry in the USA is undergoing some bad times. What would happen to this industry if you now burdened it with a conversion to metric? And what about all the other major industries?


Well, we changed our money. What can be more difficult than changing your mind about how many stuff costs? That's why I say that it's easy, 'cause I know what's changing your mind radically.

Imagine our change: 1€ is more than 166 pesetas (concretely, 166.386 pesetas). Suddenly, stuff that happened to cost 1,000 pesetas are now around 6€, so everything is like WHOAH, SO DAMN CHEAP 'cause there was some kind of "1€ = 100 pesetas" in our brains that messed everything up. But after 5 years of euro, I can guarantee to you that even the oldest people who at the beginning were in serious trouble with the conversions are now fine with it. With usage, you soon learn to measure in the new unit.

The metric system doesn't have the tradition of the Imperial or Spanish systems (yeah we do have one, and it's still used but not in official products - that also means that we changed systems a while ago and we survived), in fact it was somewhat created to make things easier in science. It's ugly and doesn't have any charm, but heck, it's useful as hell, and easy to deal with.

And change is good. Otherwise you grow spiderwebs ;)


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Moneo on February 21, 2006, 12:16:34 AM
Quote from: "na_th_an"
Quote from: "Moneo"
The big issue is CHANGE. You say that changing isn't much of hassle, and that it's not so difficult to change.  You're right regarding change on an individual basis. But what about on an industry-wide basis? The automotive industry in the USA is undergoing some bad times. What would happen to this industry if you now burdened it with a conversion to metric? And what about all the other major industries?


Well, we changed our money. What can be more difficult than changing your mind about how many stuff costs? That's why I say that it's easy, 'cause I know what's changing your mind radically......


I'll admit that changing the currency is a major issue, involving the government, the banking industry, and many facets of business systems, as well as having an impact on every individual.

However, changing the currency does not compare in magnitud to a change to the metric system for every manufacturing industry. Can you imagine, just the planning of such a transition for an industry like the automotive industry, gives me a headache.

Such a change involves redesigning and reengineering the entire automobile. All the vendors that used to supply the industry with parts may not be able to now provide similar metric parts. Do we wait for the vendors to tool-up, or do we open additional factories to make the metric parts needed? And what about the tools and robots used in the manufacture? Where do I obtain the alternate metric tools and robots? What about the service departments of the dealerships for these automobiles? They'll need new tools also.
Personnel that work on the shopfloor of the manufacturing sites, will need new training.

I could go on and on. I thing you can appreciate all that is involved.

Change is good when you're selling it, but it's a real bear when you have to buy it.
*****


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: NecrosIhsan on February 21, 2006, 02:43:56 AM
Moneo is very correct...and that's just one industry, there are hundreds upon hundreds of industries that would have to make such a huge shift.

Nice way to steer this thread off-topic though, guys... :D


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: anarky on February 21, 2006, 02:45:16 AM
So how did you get your name?

>anarky - :D


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: na_th_an on February 21, 2006, 06:24:46 AM
Well, the metric system didn't just grow up in our countries. We had our own system to measure stuff, as every country/region had. We just shifted. Most of the developed countries shifted, and I don't remember any huge troubles or falling economies for that matter.

Metric system makes your life easier, allows for more accurate results, minimizes the relative and accumulated errors, makes calculations easier (care to tell me, from the top of your head, how many inches are in 2.76 miles? ;))...

I don't think that change has to be all at once. You don't need to say "hey, we are metric now, throw all those machinery to the dustbin and buy metric one". First step is using it. Use it. If you know that an inch is 2.54 centimeters you have a start. You don't need to change your soldering machine works in steps of two inches. You just have to know that "now", that machine just works in steps of 5.08 centimeters. When the factory has to change the machinery, the new ones come measured in centimeters. Changing takes time, but it's feasible.

Now, with two major measurement systems out there (imperial and metric), things are somewhat more expensive for the only reason of having to build, for example, cars which measure speed in two different systems. Imagine any American car brand name - they have to build cars which measure in mph and then cars which measure in kph for export. The amount of money they would save building just one kind of cars would be huge.

I consider a waste of time and money all those conversions needed by your country when dealing with others.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Moneo on February 21, 2006, 08:31:29 PM
Quote from: "NecrosIhsan"
......

Nice way to steer this thread off-topic though, guys... :D


You're right Nec, and I apologize to Anarky for taking part in the off-topic discussion about metric conversions.

Nathan, I yield to your superior knowledge on the subject.
*****


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: anarky on February 22, 2006, 07:46:59 AM
Quote from: "Moneo"
Now, with two major measurement systems out there (imperial and metric), things are somewhat more expensive for the only reason of having to build, for example, cars which measure speed in two different systems. Imagine any American car brand name - they have to build cars which measure in mph and then cars which measure in kph for export. The amount of money they would save building just one kind of cars would be huge.


How? It's a peice of plastic with different stamps on it...

>anarky


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: na_th_an on February 22, 2006, 07:55:57 AM
It was an example, kiddo.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: axipher on April 25, 2006, 02:08:02 PM
My name is a product or a random string generator made from letters.  I made it as a screensaver and axipher came up so I used it.


::EDIT::

Changed sued to used as it should be


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: seph on April 25, 2006, 03:29:42 PM
Quote from: "axipher"
My name is a product or a random string generator made from letters.  I made it as a screensaver and axipher came up so I sued it.


Didja get a good settlement?

Btw cool name. I likey.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: NovaProgramming on April 25, 2006, 09:33:56 PM
Ax'i'pher-- Latin for "Digger of Old Posts"

;)


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: axipher on April 25, 2006, 10:21:48 PM
Quote from: "NovaProgramming"
Ax'i'pher-- Latin for "Digger of Old Posts"

;)


I'm not sure how I found this topic, I normally only browse the posts since last visit page, so I'm not sure how I got to this page, maybe through another post.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: tbbw on April 26, 2006, 06:30:01 AM
i whas known as Wolf on the swedish BBS.
then i got internet and on every freaking irc server, homepage that whas taken.

then a few friends nicknamed me The Big Bad Wolf along with the song "no one is afraid of the big bad wolf" coz when i whas 14yr's old i whas kinda sarcastic and sometimes realy rude.
then i got the nick [[[TBBW]]] coz it looked cool... after going on diffrent ircd's and homepages i ditched the [] coz it takes to long time to type.
and it finaly became TbbW.
i'm still called wolf on some places doh or even TB but that's oldies calling me that :P

EDIT: it whas the homepages that made me ditch the [ ] and also ircnet that had a shorter nicklen.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Anonymous on April 26, 2006, 07:21:01 AM
wow, i really wasnt sure if you were somehow related to TBBQ o.o (an old inactive member of this forum)


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: tbbw on April 26, 2006, 07:25:10 AM
ur like person nr7 that ask me that...
no i'm not TBBQ lol
like ppl came in on the #freebasic channel and whent:
"woah?! is it realy you TBBQ?"
"no the W is not a typo"


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: SJ Zero on April 26, 2006, 07:58:26 PM
Quote from: "cha0s"
excellent counterpoint, moneo


Highly irrelevant; soda manufacturers can and do create 355ml cans and 600ml bottles.

How's this for a good arguement FOR the metric system: I'm not sure if any of you have ever had to do fluid mechanics, but here's how it works: Every single imperial calculation has a "password" in front of it -- some completely arbitrary number to convert the random numbers to something that resembles each other. In metric? Nothing does. Want to know the mass of a liquid based on it's specific gravity? In Imperial, break out your lookup tables. In metric, specific gravity * 1000 kg/m^3(The number of kilograms of water in a square meter). From Reynolds Number to Bernoullis equation, you've got some different largely arbitrary obstacle.

Another major issue is that the Imperial system doesn't account for the local gravity. This is a major issue; a pound of force in New Orleans isn't a pound of force in Denver Colorado, because the local gravity is different.

Yes, America put people on the moon using their primative system of non-coherent weights and measures. Remember though, that Japan is now the technological powerhouse it is under the Metric system.

Anyway, If you want to talk about waste, every single auto shop in America and around the world needs two sets of tools; two different kinds of nuts; two different kinds of bolts; two completely different sets of equipment and infastructure for the two types of vehicles: American ones, and the ones from everywhere else. I need to spend extra time heading to a store to buy the metric fittings which would function just fine for 5.5billion out of the 5.8 billion on earth, except for the Americans. The Americans are costing industry literally billions constantly.

The worst part is that you already use metric for some things: Nobody complains about using Volts, Amps, and Ohms. Threaten to take away their furlongs per fortnight, however, or their scores per league, and they get huffy...

Anyway, on to the thread topic.


SJ Zero started out as "Sir Jason" when I first entered a chat room. I grew up a bit, and didn't like it anymore, so I changed it to SJ(Two letter names were the style at the time). Later on, I decided to slap the 'Zero' on the end because I thought it looked cool. I've been through a lot with this name, so I don't feel like changing it.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Anonymous on April 27, 2006, 04:55:01 AM
why do they use lit[re]s, sj?


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: anarky on April 27, 2006, 07:17:27 AM
Why is it American's can't spell correctly either?

They spell litre as liter, metre as meter, etc. I don't know of anywhere else in the world who spells words wrong.

Some people can't eventalk properly.

"Nucular weapons"
I remember Bush saying that. Either W or his old man...


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: j2krei08 on April 27, 2006, 05:20:21 PM
Mine was issued to me by my school. I have to use it for getting into the school's system, so I have become accustomed to it and I can type it fast. So, it's used for nearly all of my screen names (either that or radiumv (or radiumvinteractive))


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Deleter on April 27, 2006, 05:30:04 PM
Quote from: "anarky"
Why is it American's can't spell correctly either?

They spell litre as liter, metre as meter, etc. I don't know of anywhere else in the world who spells words wrong.

Some people can't eventalk properly.

"Nucular weapons"
I remember Bush saying that. Either W or his old man...

with the way litre/liter is pronounced here in the US, (lee-ter) litre would not make sense, that would be more like lee-tray. there is a sound inbetween the t sound and the r sound, so we stick the e inbetween the two. This seems natural to me just cuz its how I grew up. Personally I don't care if its rearranged, just don't make me add letters to stuff, colour is just plain stupid. ;)


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: anarky on April 27, 2006, 05:36:25 PM
I suppose eventually "knife" will be "nife"...


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: j2krei08 on April 27, 2006, 05:39:22 PM
Quote from: "anarky"
I suppose eventually "knife" will be "nife"...

Yeah, that's the same reason "ñ" or "rr" (rolling sound) aren't easy for Americans.  They aren't used in English, so there's no reason for us to know them. It's also why people mispronounce "tortilla" as tor-"till"-a (with l sounds)


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Zap on April 27, 2006, 05:41:32 PM
Quote
I suppose eventually "knife" will be "nife"...


or 'naif' :P

Unless you guys actually say 'nifeh' :lol:


Quote
It's also why people mispronounce "tortilla" as tor-"till"-a (with l sounds)


Thats more likely because they don't know that 'll' has the sound it has... I mean, its the same sound that you have in "you" (the y...)

And the ñ is just an n with the y from 'you' afterwards... so its not like you don't have the sounds, it's just from not knowing that (english) people don't say them right.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Deleter on April 27, 2006, 05:53:08 PM
Quote from: "Zap"
Quote
I suppose eventually "knife" will be "nife"...


or 'naif' :P

Unless you guys actually say 'nifeh' :lol:.

the e makes the I "say its name" lol, ai doesnt really make the I sound that I know of. ntm, there are plenty of words with a silent e at the end. Silent letters are not the problem, its putting sounds in where there is no letter representing them.

Quote from: "Zap"
Quote
It's also why people mispronounce "tortilla" as tor-"till"-a (with l sounds)


Thats more likely because they don't know that 'll' has the sound it has... I mean, its the same sound that you have in "you" (the y...)

I have never said toriLLa, its tort-EE-a. Reminds me of people who pronounce gyros "Jy-rows" instead of "your-o's"  :roll:


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: j2krei08 on April 27, 2006, 05:56:33 PM
jalapeenos, kesadilla, pour fayver...
it's irritating.

Ugh, just look at Peggy Hill from "King of the Hill." That just drives me nuts.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: anarky on April 27, 2006, 07:00:54 PM
I didn't know all that, Stupid English teachers...


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: DrV on April 28, 2006, 03:17:21 AM
Quote from: "Deleter"
I have never said toriLLa, its tort-EE-a. Reminds me of people who pronounce gyros "Jy-rows" instead of "your-o's"  :roll:

I thought it was more like "heros"...


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Zap on April 28, 2006, 09:55:27 AM
Deleter: My point was that the reason that (some, english) people say tortiLLa with L-sound, is not that english lacks some sound (as j3krei suggested), but simply because (some, english) people do not know how to pronounce it.

And it's tort-EE-ya :P The double-l makes a y sound (as in "you"), or even an l-sound followed by a y-sound (tort-eel-ya) depending the dialect. And if it's to be 100% correct, you need to roll on the r also :P


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Anonymous on April 28, 2006, 10:30:52 AM
yuuup. here you dirty americanS! :lol:

yEh-(rolled r)-o

Kay sah Dee ahs

Ha la Pain yohs

;pp


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: RADIUM-V Interactive on April 28, 2006, 11:58:05 AM
Also, have you noticed most other languages have 6 different versions for 1 verb?

I think Americans are just lazy :zzz:


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Deleter on April 28, 2006, 03:58:20 PM
yeah, cuz you really need 6 versions of a word. thats like saying binary is inferior or something just cuz it only has 2 different numbers per digit rather than 10.... :roll:


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: TheDarkJay on April 30, 2006, 03:29:43 AM
Quote from: "RADIUM-V Interactive"
Also, have you noticed most other languages have 6 different versions for 1 verb?

I think Americans are just lazy :zzz:


lol. That would explain why they don't use U in words.

Color...is that what dogs wear?


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: jupiter3888 on May 01, 2006, 09:33:47 PM
Quote from: "TheDarkJay"
Color...is that what dogs wear?

nah, that would be collar.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: na_th_an on May 03, 2006, 04:33:10 AM
Quote from: "Deleter"
yeah, cuz you really need 6 versions of a word. thats like saying binary is inferior or something just cuz it only has 2 different numbers per digit rather than 10.... :roll:


Not exactly. We may have 6 words which could translate to one of yours but that in fact express slightly different things.

Also, you have many "made up words" using several existing words when we have a special, dedicated word:

look = mirar
look for = buscar
look after = cuidar
look into = investigar
look upon = considerar
look out! = ¡cuidado!
look up = consultar
look forward = ansiar
look in on = visitar

put = poner
put on = vestir
put off = apagar
put away = descartar
put down = finalizar
put forth = cultivar
put in = meter
put out = sacar
put over = posponer
put together = construir
put up = levantar
put upon = imponer
...

see what I mean?

That makes a language more beautiful and rich. It favourishes poetry, for example. You can really choose which words to use to express yourself, which is extremely nice.

It's a nightmare for foreigners wanting to learn proper Spanish, but Chinese is more difficult :D


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Moneo on May 04, 2006, 08:12:34 PM
Nathan, You made a very good point about Spanish words. However,I hope you don't mind, but I have the following suggestions. Some are replacements and others are additional usages.

put off = posponer
put out = apagar

throw away = descartar
put away = guardar

put down: is not really finalizar.
put down the pen = soltar la pluma
put down on paper = poner en papel
He put down Mary = Insultó o puso en ridículo a Mary.

take out = sacar
put out the cat = sacar el gato
put out the light = apagar la luz

put over = tapar

put together = unir

I put up with her = La soporto o la aguanto.

*****


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: neuro on May 04, 2006, 08:33:19 PM
neuro: i dunno just seemed cool back in '98
fez (my chat nickname): short, pronouncable, typable w/ 1 hand, and at the time, available on dalnet
cheesemoldy (aim name): coz every god damn aim name is taken. Even moldycheese was taken.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: nkk_kan on August 07, 2006, 06:50:45 AM
well nkk are my intials
i like it because it's simple short and fast type-able.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Liquid Snake on August 08, 2006, 01:38:15 AM
Liquid Snake was always my favorite bad guy video game character.  Evil, but has a sense of humor.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Kylemc on August 08, 2006, 06:05:02 PM
My name is Kyle McInnes. Enough said.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: LooseCaboose on August 08, 2006, 06:28:57 PM
Quote from: "na_th_an"

look = mirar
look for = buscar
look after = cuidar
look into = investigar
look upon = considerar
look out! = ¡cuidado!
look up = consultar
look forward = ansiar
look in on = visitar

English (and other languages as Moneo pointed out) often has more than one of expressing something, ie:
look for = search, seek
look after = tend, care, nurse
look into = investigate, examine, inspect
look upon = gaze, consider
look out! = watch out, careful
look up = consult
look forward = envision
look in on = visit

You can be poetic in any language, its just a matter of learning it properly ;-). Some languages like Japanese do have multiple words that mean the same thing. For example Japanese has several different numbering systems for counting different things (ie people, objects, money) and many words are different based on the formality of discussion.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Liquid Snake on August 08, 2006, 10:00:01 PM
Quote from: "TheDarkJay"
Quote from: "RADIUM-V Interactive"
Also, have you noticed most other languages have 6 different versions for 1 verb?

I think Americans are just lazy :zzz:


lol. That would explain why they don't use U in words.

Color...is that what dogs wear?



hmmm, I seem to remember that Europeans tend to use S more than Z.  Such as Customise or Realise.

We're not the only ones who are lazy.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Kylemc on August 09, 2006, 04:57:06 AM
Using S over Z isn't being lazy, it's how English originally was. Americans decided to change it for some reason.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Liquid Snake on August 09, 2006, 09:55:46 AM
OK my bad I guess.  How'd we end up in this discussion anyway?


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Kylemc on August 10, 2006, 07:08:15 PM
Using S over Z isn't being lazy, it's how English originally was. Americans decided to change it for some reason.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Dr_Davenstein on August 10, 2006, 07:25:56 PM
Hmmm... Like a child rebelling against his or her parents, I suppose... or should we say, suppoze?  :lol:


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: TheAdventMaster on August 10, 2006, 08:31:24 PM
Quote from: "seph"
I'm thinking maybe I should change it again soon, just because everyone else seems to (well maybe just Nek)...
Or maybe you're insulting Sephiroth? . . . That's like me signing up on a site as I don't know, v3codDrJeffev


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Rattrapmax6 on August 10, 2006, 08:44:29 PM
Quote from: "Kylemc"
Using S over Z isn't being lazy, it's how English originally was. Americans decided to change it for some reason.

Yeah, I tend to spell things out how original UK English does, because, in my mind, Noah Webster was just pissed at England when he took things out that didn't seem to fit in his mind, like u in most words ending in a "or" sound: Colour, flavour, savour, etc .... and since words like "centre" wasn't spelled like he'd spell it "center", lol....

I get asked if I'm from the UK alot though, lol.. I just say, "I'm just rebeling the American's rebelion of England.." .... Just in less confusing words....

 :lol: Props for open office, it has a UK spell checker, my old MS Word hated the way I spelled this stuff.... XD


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: torstum on August 29, 2006, 07:23:55 PM
Based on scandinavian mythology, there's a lightning-wielding god called Thor. It also has some influence of a really nifty shape called a torus.


Title: So how did you get your nickname used here?
Post by: Skyler on August 29, 2006, 10:49:29 PM
Skyler was my alias in a club called the ACNOTS.

The club was called the ACNOTS because we thought it sounded cool.